Monday, November 25, 2013

Thanksgiving Tips for Keeping Your Dog Safe

Peke and Chloe at A Hotel for Dogs in Middletown, NJ


As the holiday feast is spread out on the table, and the tantalizing smells waft through the air, your eager pup will be on the lookout for scraps dropping to the floor or offered directly from well-meaning fingers. After all, Thanksgiving is about giving thanks for everything and everyone - human and canine - in your life, and taking the time to celebrate together.

So here are five foods to keep away from your dogs, and five that are OK to share.

Foods NOT to Share:


  • Bones. Despite what popular culture would lead you to believe, bones can seriously harm your dog. Not only can they lead to broken teeth, ripped up gums and tongue, but they can easily get stuck in different parts of your dog's body. A bone stuck in the throat can cause choking. Bone pieces can create blockages in the intestines and cuts in the stomach (which causes internal bleeding and possible serious infection).
  • Turkey Skin & Raw / Uncooked Turkey. Turkey skin is a fatty food that can strain your dog's pancreas. And raw or uncooked turkey can contain salmonella poisoning.
  • Dough / Cake Batter. Raw dough and your dog's own body heat really can cause the dough to rise in your dog's stomach. This can cause vomiting and abdominal pain. Not only that, but many raw dough and batter recipes involve eggs - there's the salmonella poisoning again.
  • Onions & Garlic. Onions and garlic contain sulfides. Sulfides are toxic to dogs and harm their red blood cells.
  • Beer. Yes, your dog may love beer as much as you do. But it can really upset your dog's body, and should they drink too much, cause a fever, rapid heartbeat, potential seizures, and even liver damage.


Foods SAFE to Share:


  • Turkey. Never fear, the same turkey you plan to eat (cooked and no bone), is the same turkey that's safe to share with your pup.
  • Sweet Potatoes. Just be sure not to give your dog bites with skin.
 
  • Raw Carrots. Good for you, and good for you dog.
  • Corn. In small amounts, corn can really give your dog an energy boost. Just don't overdo it.
  • Apple Slices. These are another thing best given raw, without any extra sugar that comes from baking it in a pie or the like.


If you pick up a piece of food and just aren't sure, best to err on the side of safety and keep it away from your dog. To make up for it, why not give them an extra scratch behind the ear when you're both lounging on the couch relaxing? They'll still love you even if they can't eat a slice of pie.

All these safety tips and tricks were gathered from multiple sources, many which list even more foods that are safe and not safe for your dog. Feel free to check out TakePart.com and ILoveDogs.com for what's good and not good to eat.

Happy Thanksgiving!

``Hotel for Dogs Staff

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